1. 
Before William Stoner the future lay bright and certain and unchanging. He saw it, not as a flux of event and change and potentiality, but as a territory ahead that awaited his exploration. He saw it as the great University library, to which new wings might be built, to which new books might be added and from which old ones might be withdrawn, while its true nature remained essentially unchanged. He saw the future in the institution to which he had committed himself and which he so imperfectly understood; he conceived himself changing in that future, but he saw the future itself as the instrument of change rather than its object.

This photo of a well-read  Stoner, along with its staff pick slip, was sent into us by a librarian, so in honor of that, here’s Stoner himself thinking about the future as a great university library.

Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (sometimes we’ll make an exception for a beer, even)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    Before William Stoner the future lay bright and certain and unchanging. He saw it, not as a flux of event and change and potentiality, but as a territory ahead that awaited his exploration. He saw it as the great University library, to which new wings might be built, to which new books might be added and from which old ones might be withdrawn, while its true nature remained essentially unchanged. He saw the future in the institution to which he had committed himself and which he so imperfectly understood; he conceived himself changing in that future, but he saw the future itself as the instrument of change rather than its object.

    This photo of a well-read  Stoner, along with its staff pick slip, was sent into us by a librarian, so in honor of that, here’s Stoner himself thinking about the future as a great university library.

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (sometimes we’ll make an exception for a beer, even)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  2. “Day after day, when I still worked at the Forty-second Street branch of the public library, I saw the same young man, bearded, intense, cleaning his fingernails on the corners of the pages of a book. “What are you studying for?” I asked him once. The numbers were flashing over the counter as the books came up. “Research,” he said. “I’m writing my autobiography.” There are certainly odd people in that reading room—one who doodles the same bird endlessly on the back of a half of a single bank check, one who hums all the time, and one who keeps asking the other two to stop. A little pantomime concerto. I quit that job soon. The trouble is, I sometimes understand that research project. Or I did understand it. Then.”

    — 

    Thanks to Molly McArdle, who in her latest Classic Returns column at Library Journal pulls out this passage from Renata Adler’s Speedboat.

    And might we suggest the passage to anyone looking to participate in the Urban Librarians Unite–sponsored 24 Hour Read-In at the Brooklyn Public Library (or any other library read-ins).

  3. Check out the Cornelia Street Lending Library near our offices! They’re accepting books and DVDs, no magazines please. There aren’t any NYRB titles included yet, but we’ll keep our eyes peeled.
These little free libraries are a welcome respite from seeing discarded titles on the sidewalk. And the solar-powered nightlight on this one is a very nice touch.

    Check out the Cornelia Street Lending Library near our offices! They’re accepting books and DVDs, no magazines please. There aren’t any NYRB titles included yet, but we’ll keep our eyes peeled.

    These little free libraries are a welcome respite from seeing discarded titles on the sidewalk. And the solar-powered nightlight on this one is a very nice touch.

  4. A True Deceiver–inspired haiku, part of Feeding the Paper Ghosts,

a guerrilla arts project for libraries.… I go into a library and choose a book.  I copy the book cover and one  of the pages chosen at random and use these to make a postcard.  The  postcard has a collaged image and a short poem (a haiku) and also the  name of the book written on it.  I put the postcard into another book in  the library.

Read more about the project here.

    A True Deceiver–inspired haiku, part of Feeding the Paper Ghosts,

    a guerrilla arts project for libraries.… I go into a library and choose a book. I copy the book cover and one of the pages chosen at random and use these to make a postcard. The postcard has a collaged image and a short poem (a haiku) and also the name of the book written on it. I put the postcard into another book in the library.

    Read more about the project here.

  5. theartofgooglebooks:

Page-turning motion, hand of employee, endpapers, bookplates, title page… and auto-corrected fingers, displaying a kind of mirroring.
From the front matter of Pyritologia: or, A History of the Pyrites, the Principal Body of the Mineral Kingdom by Johann Friedrich Henckel (1757). [Here]

    theartofgooglebooks:

    Page-turning motion, hand of employee, endpapers, bookplates, title page… and auto-corrected fingers, displaying a kind of mirroring.

    From the front matter of Pyritologia: or, A History of the Pyrites, the Principal Body of the Mineral Kingdom by Johann Friedrich Henckel (1757). [Here]