1. Fiery Friday

    image

    The fact that quite a few NYRB Classics sport rather “inflammatory” covers recently became a topic of interest around here. We got to wondering if we’re all repressed pyromaniacs. Or if some mad marketing employee here decided that “fire sells.” Not that anyone buys a book for its cover or anything.

    Underneath the sizzling exteriors of each of the above titles, however, is a really great story. Clockwise from the top-left:

    Unforgiving Years, Victor Serge’s harrowing depiction of World War II, told from the streets of Paris, Leningrad, a destroyed city in Germany, and, in the aftermath, Mexico.

    Memed, My Hawk, a novel by Yashar Kemal about a young boy growing up in a desperately poor village in Turkey. He attempts escape, fails, tries again and … you’ll have to read the book.

    Hav, a one-of-a-kind novel in which Jan Morris wields her legendary travel writing skills to bring to life a completely fictional and utterly beautiful city. After reading this book, it’s hard to believe that Hav doesn’t exist in our world.

    Blood on the Forge, by William Attaway. A devastating vision of the African-American Great Migration that follows the fictional Moss brothers’ escape from the rural South, only to find themselves in the inferno of the Northern steel mills. (The cover is, aptly, a photograph of molten steel. Youch.)

    Fiery photo credits/descriptions in the same order: Antony Gormley, Waste Man, 2006; Waves of fire near cattle pens, Chase County, Kansas, 1990 © Larry Schwarm; Hav cover image © Lee Gibbons; Molten steel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania © Nathan Benn/Corbis.

  2. There’s something mighty familiar about the design of the Blu-ray cover for the animated My Dog Tulip, but we just can’t put our paw on it.

    There’s something mighty familiar about the design of the Blu-ray cover for the animated My Dog Tulip, but we just can’t put our paw on it.

  3. kelsfjord:

    other covers for the other covers for the other covers for the other covers for the other

  4. Caustic Cover Critic: Hanson on Amis →

    The “reliably amazing” (two can play at that game) Caustic Cover Critic has a round-up of our forthcoming Kingsely Amis covers by Eric Hanson, including two you probably haven’t seen yet.

  5. Katy Homans has been on a burnt orange + acid green kick recently.Advance copies of The Expendable Man by Dorothy B. Hughes and Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, translated by Donald Rayfield; Confusion pin

    Katy Homans has been on a burnt orange + acid green kick recently.
    Advance copies of The Expendable Man by Dorothy B. Hughes and Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, translated by Donald Rayfield; Confusion pin

  6. Another excellent Robert Sheckley pulp paperback cover. (Here’s one more.) Store of the Worlds, coming from us this spring.
genelogic:

Robert Sheckley, Shards of Space (1962), cover by Hoot von Zitzewitz. Don’t ask me if that is the artist’s real name.

    Another excellent Robert Sheckley pulp paperback cover. (Here’s one more.)
    Store of the Worlds, coming from us this spring.

    genelogic:

    Robert Sheckley, Shards of Space (1962), cover by Hoot von Zitzewitz. Don’t ask me if that is the artist’s real name.

  7. We can’t decide, Good ’80s book cover design or awful ’80s book cover design?
(Either way, it’s kind of great.)

    We can’t decide, Good ’80s book cover design or awful ’80s book cover design?

    (Either way, it’s kind of great.)

  8. Aufsätze (Essays) and Geschwister Tanner (The Tanners) by Robert Walser. Cover and Interior art (in the essays) by Robert’s brother Karl. Both via Project Gutenberg.

    Project Gutenberg has several of Walser’s works available in German.

  9. French edition of JP Manchette’s Fatale, illustrated by comics artist Jacques Tardi. Surprisingly, the figure on the French cover is significantly more dressed than the one on ours. A first? A last?
Tardi has also produced several graphic-novel adaptations of books by Manchette, published in the US by Fantagraphics.

    French edition of JP Manchette’s Fatale, illustrated by comics artist Jacques Tardi. Surprisingly, the figure on the French cover is significantly more dressed than the one on ours. A first? A last?

    Tardi has also produced several graphic-novel adaptations of books by Manchette, published in the US by Fantagraphics.