1. powells:

Which women in translation will you read in 2014?

Buy Tove Jansson’s The Summer Book, translated by Thomas Teal, or Colette’s Pure and the Impure, translated by Herma Briffault, from Powells and get 30% off the cover price (for a limited time)!

    powells:

    Which women in translation will you read in 2014?

    Buy Tove Jansson’s The Summer Book, translated by Thomas Teal, or Colette’s Pure and the Impure, translated by Herma Briffault, from Powells and get 30% off the cover price (for a limited time)!

  2. 
Grandmother had had to be frugal all her life, and so she had a weakness for extravagance. She watched the basin and the barrels and every crevice in the granite fill with water and overflow. She looked at the mattresses out being aired and the dishes that were washing themselves. She sighed contentedly, and, absorbed in thought, she filled a coffee cup with precious drinking water and poured it over a daisy.
—Tove Jansson, The Summer Book

This reader-submitted photo was taken at what looks like Verb Café in Williamsburg—right next to the excellent Spoonbill & Sugartown Booksellers—in late October. She writes, that on the “last of the autumn Sundays … you gather close to your steaming mug and open book; the last pages of summer.”
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    Grandmother had had to be frugal all her life, and so she had a weakness for extravagance. She watched the basin and the barrels and every crevice in the granite fill with water and overflow. She looked at the mattresses out being aired and the dishes that were washing themselves. She sighed contentedly, and, absorbed in thought, she filled a coffee cup with precious drinking water and poured it over a daisy.

    —Tove Jansson, The Summer Book

    This reader-submitted photo was taken at what looks like Verb Café in Williamsburg—right next to the excellent Spoonbill & Sugartown Booksellers—in late October. She writes, that on the “last of the autumn Sundays … you gather close to your steaming mug and open book; the last pages of summer.”

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  3. Tove Jansson is the third most recognizable cultural figure in Finland! →

    If this doesn’t get you to read her, what will?

  4. 
Anna read her books afresh, and it seemed suddenly as if she had a large circle of friends, all of whom lived more or less adventuresome lives. She was happier. When Mats came in the evenings, they would drink tea in the kitchen while reading their books and talking about them. If Katri came in, they were quiet and waited for her to leave. The back door would close, and Katri would have gone.
“Does your sister read our books?” Anna wanted to know.
“No. She reads literature.”

—Tove Jansson, The True Deceiver
Tea and a trio of Tove Jansson novels, submitted by subfuscous.tumblr.com
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea ? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    Anna read her books afresh, and it seemed suddenly as if she had a large circle of friends, all of whom lived more or less adventuresome lives. She was happier. When Mats came in the evenings, they would drink tea in the kitchen while reading their books and talking about them. If Katri came in, they were quiet and waited for her to leave. The back door would close, and Katri would have gone.

    “Does your sister read our books?” Anna wanted to know.

    “No. She reads literature.”

    —Tove Jansson, The True Deceiver

    Tea and a trio of Tove Jansson novels, submitted by subfuscous.tumblr.com

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea ? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  5. 
“I’ve made some coffee. You do drink coffee, don’t you?”
“No,” said Katri pleasantly. “I don’t drink coffee.”
Anna was taken aback, more astonished than hurt. Everyone drinks coffee if it’s offered. It’s only proper; you do it for the hostess’s sake. She said, “Tea, perhaps?”
“No thank you,” said Katri Kling.
—Tove Jansson, The True Deceiver, translated by Thomas Teal


(Chad Post of Three Percent recently picked The True Deceiver as one of the 20 Best Books in Translation You’ve Never Read.)
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    “I’ve made some coffee. You do drink coffee, don’t you?”

    “No,” said Katri pleasantly. “I don’t drink coffee.”

    Anna was taken aback, more astonished than hurt. Everyone drinks coffee if it’s offered. It’s only proper; you do it for the hostess’s sake. She said, “Tea, perhaps?”

    “No thank you,” said Katri Kling.

    —Tove Jansson, The True Deceiver, translated by Thomas Teal

    (Chad Post of Three Percent recently picked The True Deceiver as one of the 20 Best Books in Translation You’ve Never Read.)

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  6. Happy 10th Birthday London Review Bookshop!

    image

    Our friends at London Review Bookshop compiled a list of their Top Ten Most Popular Fiction Books to commemorate turning ten, and guess what?!  The Summer Book by Tove Jansson (in a lovely edition from Jansson’s UK publisher, Sort Of Books) and The Case of Comrade Tulayev by Victor Serge top the list.

    Congratulations, London Review Bookshop, and thank you for being such great supporters!

  7. “Each time I return to her I am reminded of what matters: love and work, the simplest things.” →

    Kathryn Heyman would rather take Tove Jansson’s Fair Play with her to a desert island than the complete works of Shakespeare.

  8. Tove Jansson: The Artist Whose Writing You Need To Know →

    How did we miss this nice endorsement of Tove Jansson from inkt|art, a journal of women in comics? (A journal that lists Nicole Hollander as “grande dame” in its masthead!)

  9. myimaginarybrooklyn:

booksactually:
“Katri was silent. When her silence continued, Anna understood that she’d said something important. She repeated it. ‘One for me and one for you. We’ll share. We’ll share Central Europe.’ It sounded adventurous. She said it again. Katri drew a deep breath and said, with a certain chill, that it was out of the question. But if Anna had no objection, they could assign half the royalty from United Rubber to Mats.‘Do so,’ said Anna. ‘That’s fine. And not another word about United Rubber, ever.’Katri opened the black notebook and, in her own sweeping hand, wrote, ‘Mats 1%’.‘Is there anything else of importance ?’‘No, Anna,’ Katri said. ‘We’ve done what matters most.’”— from The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson

    myimaginarybrooklyn:

    booksactually:

    “Katri was silent. When her silence continued, Anna understood that she’d said something important. She repeated it. ‘One for me and one for you. We’ll share. We’ll share Central Europe.’ It sounded adventurous. She said it again. Katri drew a deep breath and said, with a certain chill, that it was out of the question. But if Anna had no objection, they could assign half the royalty from United Rubber to Mats.

    ‘Do so,’ said Anna. ‘That’s fine. And not another word about United Rubber, ever.’

    Katri opened the black notebook and, in her own sweeping hand, wrote, ‘Mats 1%’.

    ‘Is there anything else of importance ?’

    ‘No, Anna,’ Katri said. ‘We’ve done what matters most.’”

    — from The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson

  10. To your right: the first of what’s sure to be the most heartwarming Valentine’s Day gift idea you’ll get from us, courtesy of Drawn and Quarterly:

    librairiedrawnandquarterly:

    Two new colour Moomins!

  11. Wondering where to start with Tove Jansson's children's books? →

    Philip Nel can help

  12. From now until October 4, 2012 you can listen to the BBC Radio 4 adaptation of Tove Jansson’s Summer Book, read by Phyllida Law and Sophie Thompson.

    From now until October 4, 2012 you can listen to the BBC Radio 4 adaptation of Tove Jansson’s Summer Book, read by Phyllida Law and Sophie Thompson.

  13. The Summer Book—An Underrated Book You Should Read

    Depending on what kind of kid you were, you may know Finnish author Tove Jansson as the author of the delightful Moomin books — but in our opinion, her success with children’s books has overshadowed her beautiful, glistening prose for adults, particularly The Summer Book, a collection of twenty-two vignettes on the nature of summer, each one its own perfect bauble to be cherished and shined once a year.

    —Emily Temple, for an article titled "10 Underrated Books Everyone Should Read" in Flavorwire. The Summer Book has been a not-so-secret favorite for many NYRB Classics super-fans and staff. And if this doesn’t pull you in, Buzzfeed points out that Tove Jansson is one of "30 Renowned Authors Inspired By Cats." 

  14. It's Tove Jansson's birthday and the ebook of her Summer Book went on sale yesterday. →

    (click the above for links to on-line and independent booksellers that carry NYRB Classics including the Apple iBookstore)

  15. Happy Birthday Tove Jansson!

         Brunström’s island taxi put Helga ashore on a June evening. She greeted them quietly and solemnly as if at a funeral. Helga was still short, but she had grown in girth. Her face bore an expression of reserved obstinacy. They walked up to the cottage, where a fish soup stood ready on the stove, and had a hard time getting a conversation started. Helga did not want to unpack. ‘Tomorrow,’ she said. ‘Tomorrow is Her birthday.’
         In the tent, Jonna observed that Helga had brought an awful lot of luggage.
         ‘Yes,’ Mari said. ‘Let’s read for a while.’
         The cat came in to go to bed.

    —from Tove Jansson’s Fair Play. Today would have been Jansson’s 98th birthday (she died in 2001) and we wanted to celebrate with this example of her typically laconic and detached prose. Jansson is most famous for her children’s illustrated Moomin books, of which there is now a theme park called Moomin World in Naantali, Finland, but also wrote books for adults. NYRB Classics has so far published three of these—The Summer Book, Fair Play, and The True Deceiver—and has one, The Sculptor’s Daughter, in the works for the Fall 2013 season. If you want more information on Tove check out this amazing website on her, in particular we recommend you look at the Klovharu Island page, which is the inspiration behind The Summer Bookone of NYRB Classics most beloved books.