1. INTERVIEWERYou’ve announced thirty-three forthcoming books. Why thirty-three?  
CENDRARSThe list of thirty-three books that I’ve been announcing for forty years is not exclusive, restrictive, or prohibitive; the number thirty-three is the key figure of activity, of life. So this is not at all in ink. If might be an index, but it is not The Index. It doesn’t include the titles of novels which I will never write—the other day I was surprised to discover that La Main coupée, which I published in 1946, had been on this list since 1919. I had completely forgotten that! On the list are books that I will take up again and that will appear in the future. Also listed are the ten volumes of Notre pain quotidien, which are written but that I left in various strongboxes in South American banks and which, God willing, will be found by chance some day—the papers aren’t signed, and are left under a false name. I’ve also listed a group of poems that I value more than my eyes but that I haven’t decided to publish—not by timidity or pride, but for love. And then, there are the books that were written, ready for publication, but which I burned to the great detriment of my publishers: for example, “La vie et la mort du soldat inconnu” (five volumes). Finally, there are the bastards, the larvae, and the abortions which I will probably never write. 
—from Blaise Cendrars’s 1966 Paris Review interview
The Other, Moravagine, black coffee, and a Stella d’Oro (?) cookie in our Classics and Coffee Club.
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    INTERVIEWER
    You’ve announced thirty-three forthcoming books. Why thirty-three?  

    CENDRARS
    The list of thirty-three books that I’ve been announcing for forty years is not exclusive, restrictive, or prohibitive; the number thirty-three is the key figure of activity, of life. So this is not at all in ink. If might be an index, but it is not The Index. It doesn’t include the titles of novels which I will never write—the other day I was surprised to discover that La Main coupée, which I published in 1946, had been on this list since 1919. I had completely forgotten that! On the list are books that I will take up again and that will appear in the future. Also listed are the ten volumes of Notre pain quotidien, which are written but that I left in various strongboxes in South American banks and which, God willing, will be found by chance some day—the papers aren’t signed, and are left under a false name. I’ve also listed a group of poems that I value more than my eyes but that I haven’t decided to publish—not by timidity or pride, but for love. And then, there are the books that were written, ready for publication, but which I burned to the great detriment of my publishers: for example, “La vie et la mort du soldat inconnu” (five volumes). Finally, there are the bastards, the larvae, and the abortions which I will probably never write. 

    —from Blaise Cendrars’s 1966 Paris Review interview

    The Other, Moravagine, black coffee, and a Stella d’Oro (?) cookie in our Classics and Coffee Club.

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  2. Off On a Tangent: Favorite Books Published Earlier Than 2012 →

    offonatangent:

    I’m a little alarmed that I’ve signed up for at least three different “Best of” Lists for various places that pay me. They’ll be fun to compile but I admit this list, of books I adored that were published in years past (recent or not-so-recent) will be my sentimental favorite of the bunch.

    - The entire backlist of Dorothy B. Hughes, but in particular, THE EXPENDABLE MAN (1963), reissued by NYRB Classics this summer; RIDE THE PINK HORSE (1946); and DREAD JOURNEY (1945), ostensibly about a cross-country train trip where someone will die before the last stop but really a lacerating examination of Hollywood mores of the time. Way more on Hughes in the essay I wrote for the LA Review of Books in August.

    - Thomas Tryon, THE OTHER (1970). Before he turned to novels, Tryon was a promising actor whose career was essentially derailed by noted asshole Otto Preminger’s relentless abuse on set. Tryon quit Hollywood and found his real voice with this, his first novel, about 13-year-old twin boys who are polar opposites: Niles the eager-to-please one, Holland the simmering, surly one. The great thing about THE OTHER is that you’re free to interpret events any way you like, and it’s totally okay. Tryon leaves things that open.

    Raymond Kennedy, RIDE A COCKHORSE (1991) — Another NYRB Classics reissue. My god, what a monster Frankie is! Her transformation sudden, unexplained, but then she takes what she wants (like the high school bandmember in the opening chapter, then leadership of the bank where before she was a mere mousy teller) and it seems great until it isn’t. But what a ride. Shocked glee is the best way to describe reading this book.

    Elizabeth Taylor, ANGEL and A GAME OF HIDE AND SEEK — based on these two books, the first about a young woman determined to be a successful writer (and though she achieves this, it’s also her undoing), the other about the way a brief, aborted love affair hangs over lives for decades afterwards, I clearly need to read more of her books.

    Okay, so we modify the post a bit. But out of the ten “Favorite Book Published Earlier Than 2012” chosen by Sarah Weinman on her blog Off On a Tangent, four of them were our titles. And that’s as it should be.

  3. "Terror Under the Elms"

    An immediate critical and popular success on its release, The Other has long been regarded as a classic of the horror genre, a work that, like The Turn of the Screw, The Haunting of Hill House or We Have Always Lived in the Castle is as artful as it is unnerving. As in those other works, we are never quite sure where the protagonist’s idiosyncratic perceptions end and ‘reality’ begins, and the author’s prose plays an integral role in maintaining the ambiguity at the story’s heart.

    —from a review of Thomas Tryon’s The Other by Holly Hunt in the California Literary Review. Horror fiction is for all year.

  4. kelsfjord:

    other covers for the other covers for the other covers for the other covers for the other

  5. Boo!—The Other and Tom Tryon

    Every October do you watch horror films until nightmares are a nightly occurrence? How about books? If so we have a book for you, The Other by Thomas Tryon. Not only is it classic 70s psychological horror fiction (think Ira Levin’s Rosemary’s Baby and Willian Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist), but the reviews (from just last week: Red Letter Reads;  Don’t Mind the Mess; The Longest Chapter) all agree it is very well written. And if you need another hook, Gay.net points out that Tom Tryon, an actor before a novelist, is a “Vintage Hunk.” 

  6. Thomas Tryon’s The Other in The Brooklyn Rail

    From a review of Thomas Tryon’s The Other in The Brooklyn Rail:

    That [twins] Niles and Holland might also be the perfect metaphor for Hegel’s Master-Slave dialectic should not put off the casual reader. Make no mistake: This is a horror novel in a literary darling’s dress. Readers seeking a nail-biting, page-turning plot complete with gore and mayhem will not be disappointed. But while the scene of an impaled boy will haunt long after the page has passed, it is the underlying themes illuminated in each chilling interaction between twin and twin that will ultimately disturb.

    The Other won’t help anyone find the prefect costume this year—unless you’re a thirteen-year-old male twin—but it will make you think twice about staying at that Connecticut farm house you’ve had your eye on. It will also makes you doubt the benefits of a strong imagination.

  7. drewsof:

“…just when you think this is actually a psychological horror novel and it’s going to just be mind games, there’s a terrific and breathtaking build-up to a really fantastically gruesome death - and the novel spins off in yet another direction. Then, as various lines of reality begin to dissolve, you have to wonder about everything…”
Excerpted from Raging Biblioholism’s review of Thomas Tryon’s “The Other” (published by NYRB Classics)http://ragingbiblioholism.com/2012/10/03/the-other/

    drewsof:

    “…just when you think this is actually a psychological horror novel and it’s going to just be mind games, there’s a terrific and breathtaking build-up to a really fantastically gruesome death - and the novel spins off in yet another direction. Then, as various lines of reality begin to dissolve, you have to wonder about everything…”

    Excerpted from Raging Biblioholism’s review of Thomas Tryon’s “The Other” (published by NYRB Classics)
    http://ragingbiblioholism.com/2012/10/03/the-other/

  8. A sneak peek from The Other

    And up in the barn, moving from the open door, out of the sunshine, stepping back into the shadow of the loft and once more laying his glasses down, Russell Perry blinked into the dim void and took four long steps to the edge of the loft. Arms flung wide, he leaped. ‘I’m the King of the Mountain!’ Down and down and down. Hardly soaring, but dropping merely, the smell of fresh-cut hay in his nose, holding his breath and dropping into the cool dark nothingness, rushing as though late for an appointment, hurrying to where, only a blur at first, then more clearly, clearer than anything he had ever seen, astonishingly clear, reaching for him with cruel beckoning fingers, waiting to catch him as he fell, he saw in the blackness the glinting silver prongs, sharp, sharp, and fire-cold…’Eeeyaiee!' As the steel tore through his chest, shattering flesh and bone, his scream sent the mice scurrying with fright, and hot blood, all red and frothy, with little ruffles like ghastly lace, spurted into the yellow hay, and in another moment Winnie and Mr. Angelini had come running from the pump, and, at the landing, her parasol quivering, Ada stood, her body rigid, her head slightly averted, listening as the cry reached her ears, with it, on the breeze, the lazy thrum of a harmonica, while the fingers of her trembling hand pressed ever more fiercely against the sharp points of the golden crescent moon pinned at her breast.

    —sneak peek sample from the upcoming The Other by Thomas Tryon, releasing October 2nd. Apologies for the slight spoiler, but it is only on page 56 of a 250-page book so we hope you’ll forgive us, plenty more death and surprises in store. We wanted to share because we saw it as a good example of horror writing. And why else does one read horror novels if not for the frisson of some blood and gore? And below is a photo of the author, who before writing was a Hollywood actor, most famous for playing the title role in Otto Preminger’s The Cardinal.

  9. “Hot. Getting hotter.
    By day and by night, summer bloomed, blazed. The horse-chestnut
    tree became a darker green, its leaves broadening, glistening with a
    leathery, waxy sheen, its branches sprouting small prickly balls. The
    lawns, however, sprouted only dandelions, crabgrass, and witchweed.
    Awnings were useful. While certain people returned, sorrowfully,
    to the city, others arrived to enjoy the blandishments of the
    country. Some loved the weather, some endured it, some suffered
    from it. My, wasn’t it muggy, sticky, damp, humid? And in an age
    before air conditioning, too.”

    — from The Other by Thomas Tryon

  10. Fall 2012 Books preview: Part I

    As we prepare to officially launch our Fall 2012 list we wanted to share our upcoming books. This is the first part of the season, and we’ll post the remainder later:

    Growing Up Absurd by Paul Goodman: Paul Goodman was a sociologist, philosopher, poet, writer, educator, anarchist, and gay rights activist. He was one of the most influential thinkers in the second half of the 20th century, and helped inspire the student movements of the 1960s. Growing Up Absurd is his most famous and influential book on education, work, and simply growing up, and was a bestseller in its day.

    Voltaire in Love by Nancy Mitford: In the hands of Nancy Mitford the story of the sixteen-year affair between Voltaire and Madame du Châtelet is more than a biography of the world-renowned philosophe and the ground-breaking female scientist: it is an engaging and fresh love story set in a moment of rapidly evolving history.

    Young Man with a Horn by Dorothy Baker: Based on the life of the notoriously hip and talented Bix Beiderbecke, this novel shows how jazz music overtook the life of a young man, who, unable to reconcile his music with his life, drives himself quickly to destruction.

    Cassandra at the Wedding by Dorothy Baker: Cassandra Edwards—gay, brilliant, nerve-wracked, miserable—is bent on destroying her twin sister’s wedding. How much of this is her rejection of conventional mores? Or is her own instability stopping her from accepting her sister’s new life?

    Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis: One of the most celebrated comic novels of all time, particularly known for its famed hangover scene. It is the story of Jim Dixon who seethingly endures the mediocrity of provincial, collegiate life, until he can take it no longer and lets forth one of the funniest, and ultimately successful, rebellions of all time.

    The Old Devils by Kingsley Amis: A story of aging, resentment, enduring love, and friendship that won the Booker Prize in 1986. Martin Amis considers The Old Devils to be his father’s best work.

    The Stammering Century by Gilbert Seldes: Before the United States was a global powerhouse, it was a hotbed of religious dissent and movements, whose practioners feared the wrath of God and bravely struck through a harsh landscape to help their distant neighbors find Salvation. Those interested in the foundation of contemporary America’s various faiths will finds the stories here.

    The Other by Thomas Tryon: Following closely after the publication of Rosemary’s Baby, The Other was a huge financial and critical hit and a prime example of the birth of modern horror fiction. A scary tale of 13-year old twins, one good and the other very, very evil.

    Basti by Intizar Husain: Set in the heart of India and Pakistan’s bloody, and today still resonant, Partition, Basti, similar to Kiran Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss, shows how religious intolerance and nationalist politics can tear apart towns, friends, and families. An important novel considering Pakistan’s position in the world today.

    Going to the Dogs by Erich Kästner: Berlin during the Weimar era was a time of artistic creation and financial ruin. The characters in Going to the Dogs spend their days hanging on to any job or money they can get, and their nights running riot in cabarets. All the while a political and human disaster is hanging over their heads.

  11. Watch out, we’ll be republishing this next fall.
astroantiquity:

The Other, 1972, Robert Mulligan
I never got to watch the movie but Thomas Tryon’s book was good enough.

    Watch out, we’ll be republishing this next fall.

    astroantiquity:

    The Other, 1972, Robert Mulligan

    I never got to watch the movie but Thomas Tryon’s book was good enough.