1. Classics and Coffee Club VIP member Fool on the Planet must be having an emotionally intense summer between the fever dream of Alan Garner’s Red Shift and the, well, fever dream of Blaise Cendrars’s Moravagine.

    Here is the quote from Moravagine that accompanies the original post:

    Diseases are. We do not make or unmake them at will. We are not their masters. They make us, they form us. They may even have created us. They belong to this state of activity which we call life. They may be its main activity. They are one of the many manifestations of universal matter. They may be the principal manifestation of that matter which we will never be able to study except through the phenomena of relationships and analogies. Diseases are a transitory, intermediary, future state of health. It may be that they are health itself.

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send it to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  2. Alan Garner won the Life Achievement Award at the World Fantasy Convention 2012! →

    Last year we published Alan Garner’s Red Shift. And this year Garner came out with Boneland, the final book in the trilogy started with his debut novel The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. There were two Life Achievement awards given this year—the other went to George R. R. Martin.

  3. “My background is deep and set in deep time, and in a narrow space, oral traditions going back a long, long time, which I inherited by osmosis.”

    — Alan Garner, author of Red Shift, interviewed in The Guardian

  4. Red Shift at The Alchemy of Writing →

    To sum up, captivating and cryptic, with realistic, unique characters and situations, all presented with a masterful use of mystery and suspense. Add to that spell-binding dialogue, rich with layer on layer, and it’s a work that resonates with you long after.

  5. therichgirlsareweeping:

(via Red Shift by Alan Garner | New York Review Books)
OMFG YOU GUYS. Red Shift is back in print.
RIYL: Philip Pullman, really edgy young adult fiction, inter-dimensional travel, awesome things

    therichgirlsareweeping:

    (via Red Shift by Alan Garner | New York Review Books)

    OMFG YOU GUYS. Red Shift is back in print.

    RIYL: Philip Pullman, really edgy young adult fiction, inter-dimensional travel, awesome things

  6. Red Shift by Alan Garner

    This week we published Alan Garner’s Red Shift. Garner is famous for his children’s fantasy stories and re-tellings of traditional British folk tales, firmly rooted in the landscape, history, and folklore of his native county, Cheshire. Red Shift is considered one of his best works, and while sharing the natural landscape of Chesire—a central theme is Mow Crop, pictured below—it has a complexity and bleakness that other of his books lack. Here’s Emma Donoghue, author of The Room, writing about Red Shift:

    The pared-down, enigmatic dialogue and fractured stream of consciousness in Red Shift demands to be read more as poetry than prose. The style reminds me at times of the all-pervasive dread in Shirley Jackson’s ghost stories, at others of the tense exchanges in Harold Pinter’s plays, at others of Alan Bennett at his funniest. (‘You great wet Nelly,’ Tom’s father tells him. ‘You’re about as much use as a chocolate teapot.’)

    Inspired by a graffito Garner glimpsed at a railway station - ‘not really now not any more’ - this existentialist novel assumes that everything dies, and ‘it’s a pretty mean galaxy’. Red Shift has a pagan sensibility but even the Roman soldiers paraphrase Genesis 13:8: ‘let there be no strife, for we are brothers’. Somehow the continuities console; the pattern repeats, and love just might win next time. The novel ends with a two-page letter encrypted using Lewis Carroll’s code.

    Garner, who was awarded an OBE in 2001, lives with bipolar disorder, and this slim masterpiece is in the tradition of mad kings Sweeney and Lear; a message from the frontiers of pain. More than any orthodox work of historical fiction, it was this weird fantasy novel which taught me to look beyond the walls of my own era, my own reality. Garner makes the past numinous, terrifyingly real: anything but passed.

  7. Alan Cheuse reviews Alan Garner’s Red Shift for NPR’s “All Things Considered.” How we like reviews to end—“brilliant”!