1. Morel’s Invention and The 10th Victim at the Film Society of Lincoln Center

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    Morel’s Invention, the film adaptation of Adolfo Bioy Casares’s The Invention of Morel, and The 10th Victim, based on the story “Seventh Victim” in Store of the Worlds: The Stories of Robert Sheckley, will play at the Film Society of Lincoln Center tomorrow (Wednesday, August 27) as a part of their “Strange Lands: International Sci-Fi” series.

    Emidio Greco’s 1974 film Morel’s Invention will screen first, at 7 p.m., followed by Elio Petri’s 1965 The 10th Victim, which will begin at 9:20 p.m.

    For more information, visit the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s website. Photos Courtesy of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. 

  2. Sure, we’ll take your money…

    via publishersweekly:

    Welcome to Things We Like This Week, a weekly PW Tumblr feature in which staffers pick a current obsession from the world of books.


    2. The NYRB Rabbit Hole

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    Gabe Habash: NYRB is my own personal tell-tale heart. It seems like every time I’m at a bookstore or browsing their site or even someone else’s site, always, every single time, one of their books leaps in front of me. I can’t avoid their trap; NYRB is a bottomless portal of all the books you’ll love someday but that you don’t know yet. A few months back it was one of the best books I’ve read in 2014, Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age. Last month it was The Waste Books and two weird novels by Adolfo Bioy Casares. And yesterday, right there taunting me on the NYRB front page, it was The Black Spider, “a parable of evil” admired by Thomas Mann. I’ll tell you how this story will end. The next time I’m at a bookstore, I’ll lie to myself, tell myself I’m just looking, but slowly move toward the G section in fiction, just to see if they have any Gotthelf books on hand. Just a look.

    Also, they have a Book Club. Who knows how long I can hold out against that? Take my money already, NYRB.

    According to Publishers Weekly staffer Gabe Habash, NYRB causes some serious book-buyer’s angst. We’re sorry/not sorry?

    Also, you can’t resist the sinister spider pull forever, Gabe. NO ONE CAN.

    To see the other 5 things PW likes this week, see the full post here.

  3. The Invention of Morel @ WORD Bookstores

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    Today, on this island, a miracle happened: summer came ahead of time.

    —the opening sentence of Adolfo Bioy Casares’ short novel, The Invention of Morel, which is one of the staff fiction recommendations at WORD Bookstores for the month of April. 

    One thing that is not mentioned very often about this book: there are drawings inside! Norah Borges, sister of Jorge Luis Borges, provided several illustrations to go along with the story. Here’s one, a map of the island where “summer came ahead of time”:

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  4. Rory Gilmore reading Monsieur Proust by Céleste Albaret in the Gilmore Girls episode “Girls in Bikinis, Boys Doin’ the Twist”
    Sawyer reading The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares in the Lost episode “Eggtown”

    Are we missing any other NYRB Classics movie or TV cameos?

  5. “Last Year at Marienbad redux is an exhibition, public program and publication that explores the way fact and fiction merge to form accepted knowledge about people, places, events and politics. Drawing on the use of elliptical conversations in the 1961 film Last Year at Marienbad by Alain Resnais as a point of departure, the exhibition features works of art that utilize various cinematic conventions, such as editing, character development, narrative, mise-en-scène and montage, to reveal how our understanding of reality is often mediated by those very cinematic techniques.”
And part of this series, organized by The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, includes, of course, a screening of Last Year at Marienbad, which is based, in part on Adolfo Bioy Casares’s Invention of Morel:

Tuesday, October 22, 8:20pm at Film Forum
  This is Film Forum’s third event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the New York Review of Books. The NYRB Classics edition of The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares, inspiration for Alain Robbe-Grillet’s Oscar-nominated screenplay, will be on sale at their concession this night. Introduced by critic and NYRB contributor J. Hoberman. For more information, click here.

 

    Last Year at Marienbad redux is an exhibition, public program and publication that explores the way fact and fiction merge to form accepted knowledge about people, places, events and politics. Drawing on the use of elliptical conversations in the 1961 film Last Year at Marienbad by Alain Resnais as a point of departure, the exhibition features works of art that utilize various cinematic conventions, such as editing, character development, narrative, mise-en-scène and montage, to reveal how our understanding of reality is often mediated by those very cinematic techniques.”

    And part of this series, organized by The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, includes, of course, a screening of Last Year at Marienbad, which is based, in part on Adolfo Bioy Casares’s Invention of Morel:

    Tuesday, October 22, 8:20pm at Film Forum

    This is Film Forum’s third event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the New York Review of Books. The NYRB Classics edition of The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares, inspiration for Alain Robbe-Grillet’s Oscar-nominated screenplay, will be on sale at their concession this night. Introduced by critic and NYRB contributor J. Hoberman. For more information, click here.

     

  6. 'The Invention of Morel' in 'Death+Taxes'

    There is perhaps no other work of fantastic, surreal fiction that has had such a great influence, yet remains so absurdly unknown as Adolfo Bioy Casares’ brilliant novella The Invention of Morel.

    The novella, which follows a criminal castaway on a mysterious island, plays with notions of reality, simulacra, immortality, future technology, the surreal, melancholy, and love, and does so with such brilliance that Casares’ mentor and collaborator, the great Jorge Luis Borges, deemed it ‘perfect.’ Poet Octavio Paz shared Borges’ opinion.

         — two snippets from a “short, reference-driven retrospective of Casares’ The Invention of Morel,” in Death+Taxes on the occasion of the 13th anniversary of Casares’ death. Read the whole article here.

  7. Borges in the Library on his Birthday

    Google has celebrated Jorge Luis Borge’s birthday with one of their iconic homepage images.

    We’ll join in the party with a quotation from his prologue to The Invention of Morel, by his close friend and frequent collaborator Adolfo Bioy Casares (they wrote detective stories together under the name H. Bustos Domecq):

    Detective stories—another popular genre in this century that cannot invent plots—tell of mysterious events that are later explained and justified by reasonable facts. In this book [The Invention of Morel] Adolfo Bioy Casares easily solves a problem that is perhaps more difficult. The odyssey of marvels he unfolds seems to have no possible explanation other than hallucination or symbolism, and he uses a single fantastic but not supernatural postulate to decipher it. My fear of making premature or partial revelations restrains me from examining the plot and the wealth of delicate wisdom in its execution. Let me only say that Bioy renews in literature a concept that was refuted by St. Augustine and Origen, studied by Louis-Auguste Blanqui, and expressed in memorable cadence by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

    Above is a picture of Borges (left) and Bioy Casares together.