1. Renata Adler on Studio 360!

    Over the weekend, Renata Adler was interviewed by Kurt Andersen on Studio 360. She discussed (and read from!) Speedboat and Pitch Dark. It is fantastic. Listen to the interview audio below or read the article here.

    Oh, and while you’re at it, check out the Los Angeles Review of Books’ recent write-up on Speedboat here. Renata love all around! 

  2. 
But of all that killing and campaigning, that drinking and love-making, that spending and hunting and riding and eating, what remained? A skull; a finger. Whereas, he said, turning to the page of Sir Thomas Browne, which lay open upon the table—and again he paused. Like an incantation rising from all parts of the room, from the night wind and the moonlight, rolled the divine melody of those words which, lest they should outstare this page, we will leave where they lie entombed, not dead, embalmed rather, so fresh is their colour, so sound their breathing—and Orlando, comparing that achievement with those of his ancestors, cried out that they and their deeds were dust and ashes, but this man and his words were immortal.

This entry into the Classics and Coffee Club, submitted by Kim Askew, gets a little help from Virginia Woolf’s Orlando.

Do you have a picture of one of our books (ebooks count) with coffee or tea? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    But of all that killing and campaigning, that drinking and love-making, that spending and hunting and riding and eating, what remained? A skull; a finger. Whereas, he said, turning to the page of Sir Thomas Browne, which lay open upon the table—and again he paused. Like an incantation rising from all parts of the room, from the night wind and the moonlight, rolled the divine melody of those words which, lest they should outstare this page, we will leave where they lie entombed, not dead, embalmed rather, so fresh is their colour, so sound their breathing—and Orlando, comparing that achievement with those of his ancestors, cried out that they and their deeds were dust and ashes, but this man and his words were immortal.

    This entry into the Classics and Coffee Club, submitted by Kim Askew, gets a little help from Virginia Woolf’s Orlando.

    Do you have a picture of one of our books (ebooks count) with coffee or tea? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  3. "Paddy" Leigh Fermor in ‘Before Midnight’

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    As you may or may not have heard, Richard Linklater’s latest, Before Midnight, features a character named “Patrick,” loosely based on Patrick Leigh Fermor himself. The above still, in which the Patrick character has his back to the camera, has been floating around and we were thrilled to see that it looks uncannily similar to a photograph of the real “Paddy” in this same spot, the terrace of his home in Kardamyli, Greece:

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    The above photo will be included among many others of the handsome and intrepid traveler in Artemis Cooper’s Patrick Leigh Fermor: An Adventure, forthcoming from NYRB.

    [Photo from Before Midnight by Despina Spyrou, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics; Photo of Leigh Fermor by unknown photographer, Courtesy of the Patrick Leigh Fermor Archive and the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland.]

  4. “For this quiet, unprepossessing, passive man who has no garden in front of his subsidized flat, books are like flowers. He loves to line them up on the shelf in multicolored rows: he watches over each of them with an old-fashioned gardener’s delight, holds them like fragile objects in his thin, bloodless hands.”

    —  Stefan Zweig, The Post-Office Girl (via princesaquil)

  5. Can you tell how much we like street artist ROA? If you happen to live in Vienna you can go see a show of his right now. Otherwise you might have to live in London, Malaga, or in Richmond, VA if you want to check out the turtles that grace the cover of Russell Hoban’s Turtle Diary.

  6. 
Nathan Gelgud’s entry in Powell’s tote bag competition has made it to the finals. Vote for it here. It’s on the theme of serendipity in the bookstore and features Richard Hughes’s High Wind in Jamaica and Georges Simenon’s Strangers in the House among other discoveries.
Says Nathan:

One of the best feelings a reader can get at Powell’s is the feeling that somewhere on the shelves is your new favorite book. This is a personal design, done in a quick sketch kind of style that I hope captures the excitement of that feeling, of some authors and books I’ve discovered, almost by accident, just by browsing.

VOTE AQUI

    Nathan Gelgud’s entry in Powell’s tote bag competition has made it to the finals. Vote for it here. It’s on the theme of serendipity in the bookstore and features Richard Hughes’s High Wind in Jamaica and Georges Simenon’s Strangers in the House among other discoveries.

    Says Nathan:

    One of the best feelings a reader can get at Powell’s is the feeling that somewhere on the shelves is your new favorite book. This is a personal design, done in a quick sketch kind of style that I hope captures the excitement of that feeling, of some authors and books I’ve discovered, almost by accident, just by browsing.

    VOTE AQUI

  7. Move over Raymond Chandler

    Here I am, the man in the hotel bar said to the pretty girl, almost forty, with a small reputation, some money in the bank, a convenient address, a telephone number easily available, this look on my face you think peculiar to me, my hand here on the table real enough, all of me real enough if one doesn’t look too closely.
          Do I appear to be a man, the man said in the hotel bar at three o’clock in the afternoon to the pretty girl who had no particular place to go, who doesn’t know what’s wrong with him, or a man who privately thinks his life has come to some sort of an end. 
          I assume I don’t.

    —The first few paragraphs from Alfred Hayes’s In Love, which goes on sale today along with the other Hayes book we’re publishing, My Face for the World to See. Plus some of the covers from other editions of In Love. We’re pretty keen on these books right now. If you’re looking for some cool, hard, manly, mid-century American fiction, well, look no further.

  8. "America is a place where the Old World shipwrecked"

    Like Cornell’s boxes, Simic’s poems are little rectangles full of surprising juxtapositions, optical illusions, effects of scale, dreams, riddles, jokes, demurrals, boasts, all framed arbitrarily and rather impersonally by Simic’s manner, which finds an eerie evenness no matter what his poems contain.

    —from Dan Chiasson’s review of Charles Simic’s Dime-Store Alchemy: The Art of Joseph Cornell.

  9. 
The next afternoon, the chess room in the café was jammed. Mirko, sitting motionless in front of the board for four hours, defeated one player after another without uttering a word or even looking up; finally a simultaneous game was proposed. It took some time to make the ignorant boy understand that in a simultaneous game he would be the only opponent of a range of players. But once Mirko had grasped this, he quickly warmed to the task. He moved slowly from table to table, his heavy shoes squeaking, and in the end won seven of the eight games.

—Stefan Zweig, Chess Story
A free Frappuccino® to anyone who can correctly identify the corporate logo pixelated in the latest entry to our Classics and Coffee Club.*
Do you have a picture of one of our books (and yes, ebooks count) with coffee or tea? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).
*Offer not good.

    The next afternoon, the chess room in the café was jammed. Mirko, sitting motionless in front of the board for four hours, defeated one player after another without uttering a word or even looking up; finally a simultaneous game was proposed. It took some time to make the ignorant boy understand that in a simultaneous game he would be the only opponent of a range of players. But once Mirko had grasped this, he quickly warmed to the task. He moved slowly from table to table, his heavy shoes squeaking, and in the end won seven of the eight games.

    —Stefan Zweig, Chess Story

    A free Frappuccino® to anyone who can correctly identify the corporate logo pixelated in the latest entry to our Classics and Coffee Club.*

    Do you have a picture of one of our books (and yes, ebooks count) with coffee or tea? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    *Offer not good.

  10. Marc Simont: November 23, 1915–July 13, 2013

    We were sad to learn of the death of beloved children’s book illustrator Marc Simont. Simont illustrated three books in the New York Review Children’s Collection: Ruth Krauss’s Backward Day and James Thurber’s much-adored  The 13 Clocks and The Wonderful O. He is probably best known, though, for his work on the Caldecott-winning A Tree is Nice and the Nate the Great series.


    You can see a few of his drawings below (from top: The Backward Day, The 13 Clocks, The Wonderful O) and read the New York Times obituary for Simont here.

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  11. 
He picked up his coffee cup; his hand was steady. The coffee was cold, and he set the cup down again.
—Oakley Hall, Warlock

This edition of the Classics and Coffee Club poses a question: Would Ron Swanson like Warlock?
Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

    He picked up his coffee cup; his hand was steady. The coffee was cold, and he set the cup down again.

    —Oakley Hall, Warlock

    This edition of the Classics and Coffee Club poses a question: Would Ron Swanson like Warlock?

    Do you have a picture of one of our books with coffee or tea (hot or iced)? Send them to this address and we’ll post them here (making you an honorary member of the Classics and Coffee Club).

  12. Books you wantBooks you didn’t know you wantedPresents for your nieceHostess gifts

(and lots of books not even shown in the picture)

Check out the whole sale.

    Books you want
    Books you didn’t know you wanted
    Presents for your niece
    Hostess gifts

    (and lots of books not even shown in the picture)

    Check out the whole sale.

  13. THE CHRYSALIDS goes to the Beach

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    Even our dystopian novels think this heat is perfectly ungodly: a reader sent in this picture of John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids en route to the cooling Atlantic waters.

    "It was just as I had seen it in my dreams. A brighter sun than Waknuk ever knew poured down upon the wide blue bay where the lines of white-topped breakers crawled slowly to the beach. Small boats, some with colored sails, and some with none, were making for the harbour… It was so familiar I almost misgave." — from The Chrysalids

  14. “In debates, the word quixotic is nearly always meant as an insult—which puzzles me, since I can hardly think of a greater compliment.”

    — Simon Leys, “The Imitation of Our Lord Don Quixote” from The Hall of Uselessness (via invisiblestories)

  15. She called her daughters. I would rather have left. This was my whole past, insupportable yet so different now, so dead. I had told myself so many times in those years—and later too, as a matter of fact—that my purpose in life was to make good, to become somebody, in order to come back some day to those alleys where I had been a girl and enjoy the warmth, the amazement, the admiration of those familiar faces, of those little people. And I had done it, I came back; and the faces, the little people had all gone. Carlotta had gone, and Slim, Giulio, Pia, the old women. Guido too, had gone. Neither we nor those times mattered any more to the people left, like Gisella. Maurizio always says that you get the things you want, but when they are no more use.

    —From Cesare Pavese’s Among Women Only (Tra Donne Sola), which is the basis for Michalangelo Antonioni’s Le Amiche, playing at Film Forum tonight at 7 pm and introduced by Luc Sante. Among Women Only is included in our edition of The Selected Works of Cesare Pavese, translated by R. W. Flint.