1. Maddin/Malaparte

    An earlier post about Radiolab’s re-creation of the memorable scene in Curzio Malaparte’s Kaputt elicited a few questions about whether a scene in Guy Maddin’s My Winnipeg was a reference to the book.

    This, from Maddin’s From the Atelier Tovar helps to answer that question:

    20 June [2002]

    Reading Curzio Malaparte’s Kaputt! Tremendous lake of frozen horse heads! Cloudless day jammed with jabbering birdcalls…

  2. A bit jealous of the cover design for the newly released Portuguese edition of Jan Morris’s Hav (from Tinta da China)

    A bit jealous of the cover design for the newly released Portuguese edition of Jan Morris’s Hav (from Tinta da China)

  3. Malaparte’s ‘Ice Horses’ on Radiolab

    On the following day, when the first ranger patrols, their hair singed, their faces blackened by smoke, cautiously stepped over the warm ashes in the charred forest and reached the lakeshore, a horrible and amazing sight met their eyes. The lake looked like a vast sheet of white marble on which rested hundreds upon hundreds of horses’ heads. They appeared to have been chopped off cleanly with an ax. Only the heads stuck out of the crust of ice. And they were all facing the shore. The white flame of terror still burnt in their wide-open eyes. Close to the shore a tangle of wildly rearing horses rose from the prison of ice.

    —the infamous horses-frozen-in-a-lake scene from Curzio Malaparte’s novel, Kaputt.

    This week, Radiolab posted a short feature on the probability of this exact event happening—and they made a video of a tiny (plastic) horse freezing to boot!

    (Malaparte’s novel The Skin is also available as an NYRB Classic.)

  4. You Bring the Churros and Xocolata, We’ll bring the Cava* (Celebrating Catalan Literature)

    image
    Image via Wikimedia commons

    On March 25th, 2014 we celebrate Catalan literature and its translators at McNally Jackson in New York City. Reading from newly translated works will be Peter Bush, Mary Ann Newman, and Rowan Ricardo Phillips (from Pla, Monzo, Espriu, respectively).

    RSVP here.

    And we wish The Bridge Series (the first independent reading and discussion series in New York City devoted to literary translation) a very happy third birthday!

    *Food and wine listed for headline purposes only and may or may not be served at said event.

  5. "Gleefully mad, wonderfully obscene…"

    image

    Spotted at Alley Cat Books in San Francisco: this (very accurate) staff recommendation for Raymond Kennedy’s Ride a Cockhorse.

    This book rules in terms of wild categorizations. It’s been called “the sexiest book about banking/funniest book about banking,” the novel that “predicted Sarah Palin,”and a book that inspires “shocked glee," among many other things.

  6. “Death has a look for everyone.
    Death will come and will have your eyes.
    It will be like renouncing a vice,
    like seeing a dead face reappear in the mirror,
    like listening to a lip that’s shut.
    We’ll go down into the maelstrom mute.”

    — 

    from Cesare Pavese’s, “Death Will Come and Will Have Your Eyes,” translated by Geoffrey Brock

    Thanks to the Twitter feed of Einaudi Editore for reminding us of this poem, which can be read it in its entirety here.

  7. An Open Letter of Praise and Supplication (with Free Stuff at the End!) →

    mercerislandbooks:

    This month marks the US publication of a travel memoir that some have awaited for decades. The author, Patrick Leigh Fermor, died in 2011 at the age of 96, but as a young man he walked across Europe, roaming from the English Channel all the way to what was then known as Constantinople. As a middle-aged man he recounted the beginning and middle parts of that trip in two legendary books, A Time of Gifts and Between the Woods and the Water, and at last the final leg concludes in the posthumous The Broken Road. Fermor was an amazing man (if you don’t believe me, just read his biography; his military exploits alone will astonish you) and his final book deserves your attention. Few people want just the third volume of a trilogy, of course, so maybe we can work out a deal. Anyone who purchases The Broken Road from Island Books before the end of March will be entered in a drawing to win free copies of the first two books. Assuming that NYRB agrees that this is a good idea.

    We agreed. If you live in Mercer Island—lucky you, also the “the most populated island in a lake within the United States” according to Wikipedia—stop by Island Books and pick up The Broken Road for a chance to win copies of the first two books of the trilogy: A Time of Gifts and Between the Woods and the WaterAnd check out the complete post (and others) over at Message in a Bottle, the blog from the store, it’s filled with great stuff

  8. Oh. Em. Jenny Linsky.

    image

    The lifestyle blog CAKIES recently posted the most wonderful thing ever: make-your-own Jenny Linsky (and friends!) purses.

    Find instructions (and more pics of adorable cat bags and their equally adorable owners) here.

  9. Beautiful pencils brought to you by Louise Fili, who designs the covers for the New York Review Children’s Collection.
papress:

Find Perfetto Pencils near you!

[click through to the original post for a complete listing of where you can buy them.]

    Beautiful pencils brought to you by Louise Fili, who designs the covers for the New York Review Children’s Collection.

    papress:

    Find Perfetto Pencils near you!

    [click through to the original post for a complete listing of where you can buy them.]

  10. Best Translated Book Award for Fiction Longlist Announced

    image

    Many congratulations to Joanne Turnbull, whose translation of Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky’s  Autobiography of a Corpse made Three Percent’s Best Translated Book Award Fiction Longlist.

    Congratulations also to four other nominated translators that NYRB has had the honor of publishing in the past:

    Damion Searls, for his translations of Elfriede Jelinek’s Her Not All Her and Christa Wolf’s City of Angels, Or the Overcoat of Dr. Freud

    Edith Grossman, for her translation of Antonio Muñoz Molina’s In the Night of Time

    Anna Moschovakis for her co-translation of Marcelle Sauvageot’s Commentary

    Margaret Jull Costa* for her translation of Javier Marías’ The Infatuations

    *Margaret Jull Costa will be translating the NYRB Classics edition of Benito Pérez Galdós’ novel, Tristana, on sale October 2014.

  11. Renata Adler–themed Club in Williamsburg?

    Baby’s all right, Uncle Jacques and Aunt Zabeth used to say in times of worry or of crisis. Baby’s all right. A friend of theirs, an only child, had always said it, like a little incantation, when he was alone in the dark and frightened, from his babyhood, through his childhood, all his life. His friends took it up. Think of the RAF, my mother would say, for the same reason, at such times. Think of the RAF. Baby’s all right.

    —Renata Adler, Pitch Dark

    Sure, the website for Baby’s All Right cites Aldous Huxley, but is it too much to hope that this was the real inspiration?

  12. 2014 Winter Sale: 50 Books @ 50% off
(And a free tote for orders totalling $50 before shipping)
Ends soon…

    2014 Winter Sale: 50 Books @ 50% off

    (And a free tote for orders totalling $50 before shipping)

    Ends soon…

    (Source: nybooks.com)

  13. Wanted: Woman Skilled in Witchcraft

    image

    Maria Gripe’s The Glassblower’s Children hit bookstore shelves yesterday.

    Here are a few of Harald Gripe’s etchings for this rather dark fantasy: first, Wise Wit the Raven and Flutter Mildweather (reading a peculiar advertisement)…

    image

    ..the “glassblower” himself…

    image

    …and a coach with secret cargo…

    image

  14. "It’s more like me trying to do a Zweig-esque thing"

    Watch an excerpt from Paul Holdengraber’s conversation with Wes Anderson at the NYPL. Here the two discuss Stefan Zweig's influence on Anderson's Grand Budapest Hotel.

    On May 6, Zweig’s biographer George Prochnik will be back at the New York Public library in conversation with Paul Holdengraber. You can read an interview he did with Wes Anderson about Stefan Zweig in the Telegraph.

    (Stay tuned for our exclusive interview with Stefan Zweig, in which he discusses his feelings about Paul Holdengraber’s questioning of Wes Anderson about this influence on the movie. We hope that this interview will in turn be discussed more fully by Holdengraber and Prochnik in May—but only time will tell!)

  15. "Blood on the Forge" on Winter Books Lists

    image

    This hard metal held up the new world. Some were shortsighted and thought they understood. Steel is born in the flames and sent out to live and grow old. It comes back to the flames and has a new birth. But no man could calculate its beginning or end. It was as old as the earth. It would end when the earth ended. It was deathless.

    —from Blood on the Forge, William Attaway’s novel about the Great Migration and the journey of three brothers from the rural South to the harrowing steel mills of the North. 

    Blood on the Forge recently appeared in The Clarion-Ledger as one of ten “Top Mississippi Reads," and the staff at the wonderful TurnRow Book Company in Greenwood, MS, selected it as one of 20 must-reads for the winter.  Not so recently, it was also selected for this “list.”

    [Image: William Attaway; photographer unknown]