A Different Stripe

Sep 02

aky-aky:

The Rabbit House - 
Have you read The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson? I think I read it last winter. Here’s an illustration of  the cunning Katri and her yellow-eyed, wild nameless dog, (and the rabbit house too of course). 

Art inspired by The True Deceiver. I don’t know whether to be glad or relieved that we can’t see Katri Kling’s calculating yellow eyes.

aky-aky:

The Rabbit House - 

Have you read The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson? I think I read it last winter. Here’s an illustration of  the cunning Katri and her yellow-eyed, wild nameless dog, (and the rabbit house too of course). 

Art inspired by The True Deceiver. I don’t know whether to be glad or relieved that we can’t see Katri Kling’s calculating yellow eyes.

Aug 29

Happy birthday, John Williams! Today we celebrate the author of Stoner, Butcher’s Crossing, and Augustus, who was born on August 29, 1922.
Photo courtesy of Nancy Williams.

Happy birthday, John Williams! Today we celebrate the author of Stoner, Butcher’s Crossing, and Augustus, who was born on August 29, 1922.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Williams.

Aug 28

Look at that—Paul and Sandra Fierlinger’s animated version of J.R. Ackerley’s My Dog Tulip is streaming on Hulu. Here it is, featured in Hulu Summer Film School’s animation roundup.

Look at that—Paul and Sandra Fierlinger’s animated version of J.R. Ackerley’s My Dog Tulip is streaming on Hulu. Here it is, featured in Hulu Summer Film School’s animation roundup.

(Source: blog.hulu.com)

[video]


It took me three weeks to read [Life and Fate] and three weeks to recover from the experience, during which time I could barely breathe.
—Linda Grant, “A Book that Changed Me,” on Vasily Grossman’s Life and Fate,The Guardian online, August 26, 2014

Even if the last NYRB Classic you read didn’t change your life, you can still send a photo of it, posed with a cup of coffee or tea to this address, and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

It took me three weeks to read [Life and Fate] and three weeks to recover from the experience, during which time I could barely breathe.

—Linda Grant, “A Book that Changed Me,” on Vasily Grossman’s Life and Fate,The Guardian online, August 26, 2014

Even if the last NYRB Classic you read didn’t change your life, you can still send a photo of it, posed with a cup of coffee or tea to this address, and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

Aug 26

Morel’s Invention and The 10th Victim at the Film Society of Lincoln Center

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Morel’s Invention, the film adaptation of Adolfo Bioy Casares’s The Invention of Morel, and The 10th Victim, based on the story “Seventh Victim” in Store of the Worlds: The Stories of Robert Sheckley, will play at the Film Society of Lincoln Center tomorrow (Wednesday, August 27) as a part of their “Strange Lands: International Sci-Fi” series.

Emidio Greco’s 1974 film Morel’s Invention will screen first, at 7 p.m., followed by Elio Petri’s 1965 The 10th Victim, which will begin at 9:20 p.m.

For more information, visit the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s website. Photos Courtesy of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. 

200 years ago today, Shelley and his entourage find their Lake Lucerne digs not up to snuff and “flit” without paying the bill:

On Friday, 26 August [1814], a mere three days after their arrival on the lake, they suddenly decided that they had had enough. Arguing through the afternoon, as the rain fell miserably on the waters below them, they decided first to go over the St Gothard, and finally, quite abruptly, to return to England and London. They could manage it, Shelley calculated, if they took the risk of travelling by the ‘water-diligence’ used mostly by local peasants, merchants and students, down the length of the Rhine to a Channel port. The next morning, the 27th, they flitted from Brunnen at dawn on the first boat available, having packed their bags and omitted to inform or pay their landlord, and gazed back on the receding shore ironically imagining ‘the astonishment of the good people of Brunnen’. ‘Most laughable to think’, as Jane put it, ‘of our going to England the second day after we entered a new house for six months — All because the stove don’t suit.’
—Richard Holmes, Shelley: The Pursuit

Our devoted blog follower, whose blog is The Red Shoes, sent in this cosy photo with a pun that we will spare you (unless you really want to know)*
Have you a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea? By all means send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.
*She asks: “Does Shelley suffer a tea change?”

200 years ago today, Shelley and his entourage find their Lake Lucerne digs not up to snuff and “flit” without paying the bill:

On Friday, 26 August [1814], a mere three days after their arrival on the lake, they suddenly decided that they had had enough. Arguing through the afternoon, as the rain fell miserably on the waters below them, they decided first to go over the St Gothard, and finally, quite abruptly, to return to England and London. They could manage it, Shelley calculated, if they took the risk of travelling by the ‘water-diligence’ used mostly by local peasants, merchants and students, down the length of the Rhine to a Channel port. The next morning, the 27th, they flitted from Brunnen at dawn on the first boat available, having packed their bags and omitted to inform or pay their landlord, and gazed back on the receding shore ironically imagining ‘the astonishment of the good people of Brunnen’. ‘Most laughable to think’, as Jane put it, ‘of our going to England the second day after we entered a new house for six months — All because the stove don’t suit.’

—Richard Holmes, Shelley: The Pursuit

Our devoted blog follower, whose blog is The Red Shoes, sent in this cosy photo with a pun that we will spare you (unless you really want to know)*

Have you a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea? By all means send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

*She asks: “Does Shelley suffer a tea change?”

Aug 25


The hobo stood up cautiously and edged around the fire. He watched the cartomancer warily. Nuts can blow their tops easy—and this one still held a can of hot coffee.
—William Lindsey Gresham, Nightmare Alley

The person who sent in this photo of Nightmare Alley, borrowed  from her local library, (along with a cup of “tea ordinaire”—not a can of hobo coffee, to be perfectly honest) writes, “Hope it’s got a happy ending.” She’s kidding, right?
And as always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

The hobo stood up cautiously and edged around the fire. He watched the cartomancer warily. Nuts can blow their tops easy—and this one still held a can of hot coffee.

—William Lindsey Gresham, Nightmare Alley

The person who sent in this photo of Nightmare Alley, borrowed  from her local library, (along with a cup of “tea ordinaire”—not a can of hobo coffee, to be perfectly honest) writes, “Hope it’s got a happy ending.” She’s kidding, right?

And as always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

mcnallyjackson:

TONIGHT! 7PM!

Check out this great poster for tonight’s Augustus-themed event from host McNally Jackson Books. Daniel Mendelsohn and Adrian Goldsworthy will be discussing the life of Augustus and John William’s eponymously titled novel at the store at 7 PM. We’re excited about this one…

mcnallyjackson:

TONIGHT! 7PM!

Check out this great poster for tonight’s Augustus-themed event from host McNally Jackson Books. Daniel Mendelsohn and Adrian Goldsworthy will be discussing the life of Augustus and John William’s eponymously titled novel at the store at 7 PM. We’re excited about this one…

Aug 22

http://shitmycatsread.com/post/92973306745/kingsley-amis-girl-20 -

shitmycatsread:

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Uni: “Jebus, what a vicious, sick-funny, barbed little knife this book is. Kingsley—father of Martin, of course—shares the sordid tale of Sir Roy Vandervane, well into his middle years who falls smitten with a 17-year old anti-Establishment punk-hippy from hell. Vandervane himself, a…

It’s Friday, let’s see what the cats are reading…

EVENT: Daniel Mendelsohn and Adrian Goldsworthy discuss Augustus

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Join us at 7 p.m. at McNally Jackson (52 Prince Street, New York) on Monday, August 25, for a celebration and discussion of Emperor Augustus with Daniel Mendelsohn, who introduced Augustus, and Adrian Goldsworthy, author of the biography Augustus: The First Emperor of Rome. For more information, visit McNally Jackson’s website. We hope to see you there!

Aug 21

How Mavis Gallant’s irony, contempt and un-Canadianness is humourous -

Surely the headline of the day.

Aug 20

(Now is the time to drink)
Another Augustus-themed Classic and Coffee Club submission, too Classical and too of-the-moment-to pass up while we mark the 2,000th anniversary of the emperor’s death and our publication of John Williams’s (author of Stoner) epistolary novel.
If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

(Now is the time to drink)

Another Augustus-themed Classic and Coffee Club submission, too Classical and too of-the-moment-to pass up while we mark the 2,000th anniversary of the emperor’s death and our publication of John Williams’s (author of Stoner) epistolary novel.

If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

Aug 19

Washington Post, Moomin-madness

brittkpeterson:

Scouting out Tove Jansson landmarks in Helsinki and round-abouts.


Rome is not eternal; it does not matter. Rome will fall; it does not matter. The barbarian will conquer; it does not matter. There was a moment of Rome, and it will not wholly die; the barbarian will become the Rome he conquers; the language will smooth his rough tongue; the vision of what he destroys will flow in his blood. And in time that is ceaseless as this salt sea upon which I am so frailly suspended, the cost is nothing, is less than nothing.
—Letter from Augustus dated August 11, 14 AD (eight days before his death),from the novel Augustus by John Williams

Generally we post photos sent into the Classics and Coffee Club in the order that they arrive—but it’s not every day that you get one that can be tied into the 2,000th anniversary of the death of a subject of a book.
Which is not to say that we only wait for millennial milestones to post photos: If you have a shot of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

Rome is not eternal; it does not matter. Rome will fall; it does not matter. The barbarian will conquer; it does not matter. There was a moment of Rome, and it will not wholly die; the barbarian will become the Rome he conquers; the language will smooth his rough tongue; the vision of what he destroys will flow in his blood. And in time that is ceaseless as this salt sea upon which I am so frailly suspended, the cost is nothing, is less than nothing.

—Letter from Augustus dated August 11, 14 AD (eight days before his death),
from the novel Augustus by John Williams

Generally we post photos sent into the Classics and Coffee Club in the order that they arrive—but it’s not every day that you get one that can be tied into the 2,000th anniversary of the death of a subject of a book.

Which is not to say that we only wait for millennial milestones to post photos: If you have a shot of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.