1. http://shitmycatsread.com/post/92973306745/kingsley-amis-girl-20 →

    shitmycatsread:

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    Uni: “Jebus, what a vicious, sick-funny, barbed little knife this book is. Kingsley—father of Martin, of course—shares the sordid tale of Sir Roy Vandervane, well into his middle years who falls smitten with a 17-year old anti-Establishment punk-hippy from hell. Vandervane himself, a…

    It’s Friday, let’s see what the cats are reading…

  2. EVENT: Daniel Mendelsohn and Adrian Goldsworthy discuss Augustus

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    Join us at 7 p.m. at McNally Jackson (52 Prince Street, New York) on Monday, August 25, for a celebration and discussion of Emperor Augustus with Daniel Mendelsohn, who introduced Augustus, and Adrian Goldsworthy, author of the biography Augustus: The First Emperor of Rome. For more information, visit McNally Jackson’s website. We hope to see you there!

  3. How Mavis Gallant’s irony, contempt and un-Canadianness is humourous →

    Surely the headline of the day.

  4. (Now is the time to drink)
Another Augustus-themed Classic and Coffee Club submission, too Classical and too of-the-moment-to pass up while we mark the 2,000th anniversary of the emperor’s death and our publication of John Williams’s (author of Stoner) epistolary novel.
If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

    (Now is the time to drink)

    Another Augustus-themed Classic and Coffee Club submission, too Classical and too of-the-moment-to pass up while we mark the 2,000th anniversary of the emperor’s death and our publication of John Williams’s (author of Stoner) epistolary novel.

    If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

  5. Washington Post, Moomin-madness

    brittkpeterson:

    Scouting out Tove Jansson landmarks in Helsinki and round-abouts.

  6. 
Rome is not eternal; it does not matter. Rome will fall; it does not matter. The barbarian will conquer; it does not matter. There was a moment of Rome, and it will not wholly die; the barbarian will become the Rome he conquers; the language will smooth his rough tongue; the vision of what he destroys will flow in his blood. And in time that is ceaseless as this salt sea upon which I am so frailly suspended, the cost is nothing, is less than nothing.
—Letter from Augustus dated August 11, 14 AD (eight days before his death),from the novel Augustus by John Williams

Generally we post photos sent into the Classics and Coffee Club in the order that they arrive—but it’s not every day that you get one that can be tied into the 2,000th anniversary of the death of a subject of a book.
Which is not to say that we only wait for millennial milestones to post photos: If you have a shot of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

    Rome is not eternal; it does not matter. Rome will fall; it does not matter. The barbarian will conquer; it does not matter. There was a moment of Rome, and it will not wholly die; the barbarian will become the Rome he conquers; the language will smooth his rough tongue; the vision of what he destroys will flow in his blood. And in time that is ceaseless as this salt sea upon which I am so frailly suspended, the cost is nothing, is less than nothing.

    —Letter from Augustus dated August 11, 14 AD (eight days before his death),
    from the novel Augustus by John Williams

    Generally we post photos sent into the Classics and Coffee Club in the order that they arrive—but it’s not every day that you get one that can be tied into the 2,000th anniversary of the death of a subject of a book.

    Which is not to say that we only wait for millennial milestones to post photos: If you have a shot of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

  7. Augustus, 2000 Years Later

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    Today is the 2000th anniversary of the death of Augustus, and all around the world people are commemorating and celebrating the first Emperor of Rome. Here at NYRB Classics we’re marking the day with the publication of our newest book, John Williams’s Augustus, a historical novel that imagines the life of the Emperor in classical Rome (the Lebowski edition of Augustus was released in Holland last week, and has already hit #1 on the bestseller list!). Daniel Mendelsohn wrote the NYRB Classics edition introduction, a version of which can be read in its entirety in the August 14th issue of The New York Review of Books.

    If you’re in New York, you can join us at 7 p.m. on Monday, August 25, at McNally Jackson for a discussion of Augustus with Daniel Mendelsohn and Adrian Goldsworthy, author of the new biography Augustus: First Emperor of Rome. For those who want to celebrate Augustus on a global scale, here’s a roundup of some of the worldwide Augustus 2014 events, as compiled by the Commemorating Augustus Project:

    Australia

    Augustus from a Distance,” conference at the University of Sydney

    Austria

    Fathers of Europe: Augustus and Charlemagne,” a mini-exhibition at the Kunsthistorische Museum, Vienna

    Belgium

    Augustus through the Ages: receptions, readings and appropriations of the historical figure of the first Roman emperor" conference

    Czech Republic

    Colloquium Augustum conference, Prague

    France

    I, Augustus, Emperor of Rome" exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris

    Germany

    Augustus at the 2000th anniversary of his death" conference at the Katholische Akademie in Bayern, Munich

    Ireland

    The Augustan Space: A Bimillennium Celebration (Rome AD 14 – Dublin 2014 conference at Trinity College Dublin

    Italy

    Augusto exhibition at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome

    Netherlands

    An Augustus series at the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden, with talks, lectures, and exhibitions

    Portugal

    "Augusto, Imperador" exhibit at the the Museu de Numismática, Vila Real

    Spain

    Augustus and his time: at the bimillennium of the death of the emperor Augustus" series of talks at the Museo Nacional de Arte Romano, Mérida

    United Kingdom

    "Commemorating Augustus: a bimillennial re-evaluation" conference at the University of Leeds

    United States

    From anarchy to Augustus: Lessons on dealing with disorder, from Rome’s first emperor" two panel discussions at the American Enterprise Institute, Washington DC

  8. 
Jeannine was pouring the steaming coffee with maddening exactitude. Mrs. Fitzgibbons lost patience with her. “That’s coffee, not nitroglycerin,” she said. “Pour it into the cup.”
—Raymond Kennedy, Ride a Cockhorse

The Classics and Coffee Club is back from a August break with an office favorite, the enticingly monstrous Frankie Fitzgibbons of Ride a Cockhorse.
As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

    Jeannine was pouring the steaming coffee with maddening exactitude. Mrs. Fitzgibbons lost patience with her. “That’s coffee, not nitroglycerin,” she said. “Pour it into the cup.”

    —Raymond Kennedy, Ride a Cockhorse

    The Classics and Coffee Club is back from a August break with an office favorite, the enticingly monstrous Frankie Fitzgibbons of Ride a Cockhorse.

    As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

  9. 57thstreetbooks:

Yo Stoner fans, looky what’s about to drop from nyrbclassics!
Order yours here.

On sale tomorrow!

    57thstreetbooks:

    Yo Stoner fans, looky what’s about to drop from nyrbclassics!

    Order yours here.

    On sale tomorrow!

  10. “Now, once and for all, try to write down the meaning of life and then take a photocopy so you can use it again next time.” →

    —Tove Jansson, “Fireworks,” in Fair Play
    Read more here.

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    There are a lot of exciting things going on all around the world to celebrate the 100th anniversary year of Tove Jansson’s birth. For a full calendar of events, exhibitions, and readings, visit the official Tove 100 website right here. To help you scratch the surface, here are a few current and upcoming events:

    Happy Tove 100 everyone!

  12. Tove Jansson video round-up!

    If you’re really in the mood to celebrate Tove Jansson’s 100th birthday, you might check out one or all of the many videos available online about Jansson’s life and work. Above, the entire BBC Documentary, Moominland Tales: The Life of Tove Jansson, which goes into great detail about Jansson’s childhood, her family, her life in Helsinki and rural Finland, her loves, the Moomins, and her novels (particularly The Summer Book, starting around the 51:00 mark).

    Above, a lovely little film tour (no narration) around the tiny island of Klovharun, where Jansson and her partner Tuulikki Pietilä built a house (no electricity!) to live and work in during the summers.

    The office favorite around here, however, has to be this short video of Jansson drawing a couple of Moomins without ever letting go of her cigarette. She was a pro.

  13. “What can I say about people? They amaze me as much by their good qualities as by their bad qualities. They are all so different, even though they must undergo the same fate. But then if there’s a downpour and most people try to hide, that doesn’t mean that they’re all the same. People even have their own particular ways of sheltering from rain.”

    — Vasily Grossman, Life and Fate (via dushenkaa)

  14. "A little bed, a little chest, / A little chair, to muse and rest"

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    A recent episode of Slate’s Culture Gabfest paid homage to left-field songs and rhymes in children’s books, which got us thinking about Palmer Brown, who was a master of the art. Above is a tune Hickory sings to himself while setting up his new house (which he’s moved to all alone) in a meadow. And below a song from Brown’s Beyond the Pawpaw Trees, taken presumably from that book within a book, Songs from Nowhere.*

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    *The book Anna Lavinia liked the very best of all was Mrs. Tetterbrace’s Songs from Nowhere. Anna Lavinia could never be certain whether ‘Nowhere’ meant ‘No where’ or ‘Now here,’ but she learned all the songs by heart. It was a lucky thing that she learned them, because one day the book was missing, and ever afterwards she could not find it.”

  15. “Oh, whoever has been himself alone can never find another’s loneliness strange.”

    — 

    Robert Walser, “Frau Wilke” (via a-quiet-green-agreement)

    Collected in Walser’s Berlin Stories; story translated by Christopher Middleton